This past weekend's Prescott Car Show proved to be more eventful than usual as a contingent of film and art students from John Brown University, a private, interdenominational, Christian liberal arts college in Siloam Springs, arrived for a shooting of an Indie film project featuring many of the antique cars at the show.

This past weekend’s Prescott Car Show proved to be more eventful than usual as a contingent of film and art students from John Brown University, a private, interdenominational, Christian liberal arts college in Siloam Springs, arrived for a shooting of an Indie film project featuring many of the antique cars at the show.
The film’s director and principal, Jordan Hunt, a graduating senior majoring in Digital Cinema, arrived in Prescott on Saturday morning with a team of camera personnel and two actors, Baylie Brown and Alex Cottrell, to put the finishing touches on her senior class project, an Indie film entitled “Milk Aisle.”
Hunt, from Siloam Springs, said, “We were looking for old automobiles for part of the production, and we saw that Prescott was having this car show. We were also impressed with the number of old buildings we saw there, and we thought this would be a great place to shoot some of the footage.”
Taking the road trip down to Prescott Saturday morning, Hunt and her team shot scenes for roughly two hours in what proved to be perfect weather and sunny skies.
Hunt, said “It all turned out great.”
A year in the making, Hunt conceived, wrote and has overseen filming and editing of the 25-minute narrative film, which is set in 1950s-era Oklahoma and tells the story of an old-fashioned pen-pal relationship between a young African American man (played by Cottrell), who Hunt calls an “innocent prisoner,” and a woman named Ruby Sanders (played by Brown) from a white family of wealth.
According to Hunt, the two unlikely main characters meet when a letter from Ruby is inadvertently directed to James Hudson, and Hudson, in turn, replies to her “on a whim” as Hunt says, and then after a series of letters, the two build a friendship amidst the Civil Rights movement of time.
Hunt said that “Unexpected twists happen as their relationship develops.” and she said the two eventually meet in person in a grocery store, thus the title of the film “Milk Aisle.”
“I’m a passionate film maker, who believes there is a story to be told about race relations and human relations,” she said.
In addition to Prescott, parts of the production were also shot in McAlester, Oklahoma and Guthrie, Oklahoma, as well as her hometown of Siloam Springs. The story takes place in what Hunt said was “an unnamed small Oklahoma town.”
Using state of the art equipment, Hunt said the film was being shot and produced in full high definition 4K, and the production is part of her final grade as a senior, and it will be shown to the university’s student body as part of a film festival.
Hunt, who is also getting married soon, has bigger ambitions for “Milk Aisle” as she aims to enter it in other Indie film festivals.