Two themes emerged in speeches delivered during Thursday's annual Business and Industry Appreciation dinner hosted by the Prescott-Nevada County Economic Development Office, local business improvements and project development.

Two themes emerged in speeches delivered during Thursday’s annual Business and Industry Appreciation dinner hosted by the Prescott-Nevada County Economic Development Office, local business improvements and project development.
John Brannan of the Interlocal Board of Directors, said “A lot of businesses do things throughout the year to improve themselves. One of these local businesses is Cash Savers, which has spent a lot of money in the past year or so. They’ve improved their parking lot, their building, their inventory and shelving.”
“I, for one, have greatly appreciated the improvements they’ve made down there. I think their investment is a wise investment; I’ve seen a lot more cars over there with a lot of folks trading there,” he said.
“And, not to long ago, we were presented with a project that I though was never going to happen. We took on this project to develop a Civil War battlefield called the Elkins Ferry project. The idea was to acquire 440 acres with a price at $450,000. It seemed totally insane. I never thought it was going to happen, but it did happen,” Brannan said.
With grant money, the Elkins Ferry project aims to develop the site into a tourist destination as does another site currently in development, 808 acres for a Prairie D’Ane battlefield site, Brannan said.
The Interlocal Board is charged with managing all economic development activities in Nevada County, including oversight of the Economic Development Office and the Prescott-Nevada County Industrial Park.
Brannan, who is also president of the Bank of Prescott, noted that Prescott has run an economic development office for 27 years, and that it has operated with a paid director for 23 of those years, including current director, Mary Godwin.
In her speech, Godwin said Prescott and Nevada County have acquired over $15 million in grants, which she touted making the difference in projects being able to get done.
“Tourism is economic development, and these two Civil War battlefields will make a huge difference in tourism for Prescott and Nevada County in the future,” Godwin said.
Last Thursday’s annual Business and Industry Appreciation dinner was held in conjunction with the Prescott-Nevada County Economic Development Office’s annual golf tournament at the Prescott Country Club.