Although a proposed logging truck fee had failed at the May 16 meeting of the Nevada Quorum Court, the issue or the controversy that came with it is far from a resolved issue, according to one Nevada County Justice.

Although a proposed logging truck fee had failed at the May 16 meeting of the Nevada Quorum Court, the issue or the controversy that came with it is far from a resolved issue, according to one Nevada County Justice.
District 8 Justice George Smith said over the weekend, “The fee had a two-prong purpose: It would be a mandatory fee to raise revenue; the permit would ensure the county knows where loggers are working.”
Smith continued, saying “Now, a percentage of loggers, estimated at 20 percent, the majority from other counties, come in and don't get a permit, which are free. Knowing where loggers are working is essential, in my opinion, as to ascertain what logging operations damage roads.”
Smith’s motion for the fee died as his motion never received a second from another Justice, but Smith remains undeterred, and he believes the issue will emerge again.
“I guess I see a solution where no other JP sees a problem,” he said.
Smith continued, saying “I’ve had loggers tell me that when they are shut down in other counties during wet conditions, they come to Nevada County. The county road foreman is doing a good job of trying to locate all the logging operation but with a mandatory fee, the location of each operation would be known and roads could be checked.”
Smith said the fee would be due for each separate parcel that is not contiguous and/or not owned by same landowner.
“If the loggers don't get a permit, how will the county know where they are? Only way unless a county employee sees it and report it is a stringer fee/permit system that pinpoints location. And if the don't pay the $50 fee, the proposal raised the permit fee to $100,” he said.
Smith conceded a "permit" could be considered a “tax” of sorts, answering concerns about “raising taxes,” but in Smith’s mind, he said there is no difference than a "permit" to add an addition to a residential house.
“Many loggers are very good about trying not to tear up the roads. Others simply don't care. And, some loggers will haul in rocks and do dirt work to put the road back into shape. Some will not. The county needs money and needs the roads in good shape. This proposal addressed both of this goals,” he said.