Hebb Sorrells, former Nevada County Deputy, was honored at the February Nevada County Court meeting. He was recognized by Justice Brenda Stockton, for his commitment to his community and law enforcement.

Hebb Sorrells, former Nevada County Deputy, was honored at the February Nevada County Court meeting. He was recognized by Justice Brenda Stockton, for his commitment to his community and law enforcement.
Sorrells thanked the court after he was recognized.
"Good people and support makes time fly by," he said. "I'd still be there is I was able."
In addition to being appreciative of his peers and community, Sorrells mentioned how important his wife is to him.
"She is my right hand. A lot of how I worked and how I handled things was because of Brenda," he said. "I'd come home frustrated, but she helped me get through it."
Sorrells said he started his career in 1992 and was given advice that still remains true.
"Give people the benefit of the doubt, put your self in other people's shoes, but always be on guard," he said. "This is a great community and I'll spend the rest of my days here."

In other news from February's Nevada Quorum Court meeting:

Logging operations and the possibility of creating new logging ordinances were discussed at the monthly Nevada County Quorum Court meeting last week. Justice George Smith addressed the body with suggested ordinance language that might give the county more power to hold logging companies accountable for damaging roads.
"I'm not suggesting we vote on this tonight, but I'd like us to consider the idea and see if it would be beneficial," Smith said. "For the most part, logging companies do a good job cleaning roads and not causing more damage than necessary, however, for the few that do not respect the roads and operating conditions, I wonder if an ordinance might be a good idea."
Currently, loggers are required to obtain a permit from the court, and efforts to monitor logging activities have been increased, Judge Mark Glass explained.
In addition to logging practices being brought to the attention of the court, litter along road ways was also discussed.
More than 2,000 pounds of trash was recently collected along thoroughfares in Nevada County.
A committee was formed to investigate the possibility of having the court system leverage community service or incarcerated debtors to work off sentences and fines by cleaning roadways of trash.
Justice members stated that more than $1.5 million in fines is currently owed to the county.
"It should not fall to our retired residents to pick up trash along their walks," said Justice Tommy Poole. "If we can leverage citizens who owe the county money, but can't afford to pay, then that's something we need to look into."
Suggestions to have law enforcement guard incarcerated persons serving time in leu of fines was made. However issues with limited personnel and red tape around how to pay volunteer officers were raised.
Smith also presented suggestions to ensure the court remained transparent. A unanimous motion was passed that will allow Smith to collaborate with courthouse staff to utilize social media to communicate and interact with citizens.